Timeline
  • 1792: The American Ship, Columbia, offshore from the Umpqua River, was visited by Natives paddling Canoes laden with goods for trade.
  • 1792: The British Ship, Jenny entered the mouth of Umpqua River and spent some days trading with the "numerous" and "savage disposition" natives.
  • 1828: The Lower Umpqua tribe massacre the party of the famous pioneer Jebediah Smith. Despite this, early Native-White relations in the area were generally peaceful.
  • 1830: By this time European and American fur traders had established contacts and routes.
  • 1835: Horace Walker, a wealthy rancher with a pioneer spirit came west on a boat after pulling some favors in his fur trader network. Once he arrived he and the small band he put together to stake his claim honestly got a bit lost. But when asked Horace would say that he never felt lost, instead, he felt like he was drawn to the little valley. The hetman of the village of Mith-Ih-Kwuh and Horace became fast friends and Horace married the hetman's daughter
  • 1850s: When there was an influx of American Miners and Settlers tensions increased.
    • October 1850: The Kate Heath came into Coos Bay bringing a boatload of immigrants. They traded with the natives for hundreds of pounds worth of dried elk.
    • July 31, 1854: Congress approved the Indian Appropriations Act. Joel Palmer, the superintendent of Indian Affairs for Oregon decided on a stretch of coastline that didn't have gold or good farmland, hence desired by whites, to turn into the reservation for most of the southwestern natives.
  • 1855: In the summer, A treaty concluded with most of the Oregon Coastal peoples. However Senate action on the treaty was delayed, in part due to the outbreak of hostilities mentioned below. The Treaty was never ratified.
    • Star-crossed lovers Edgar Walker and Abigail Rocklin were at the center of a whirlwind of bloody tragedy and drama. After they snuck into the woods to have some alone time away from their feuding families, a turn of horrible weather forced them to take refuge in a cabin. The owners of the cabin didn't take kindly to that and it cost them and the town of Mythic Wood dearly. For further information on this event, please see: Lestrange Family.
  • 1855 - 1856: Even though the natives of Mythic Wood and Coos Bay and further north were not the ones participating in much hostility against the Whites Lower Couilles tribes caused a war that engulfed Southwestern Oregon and affected even the peaceful natives of the area badly.
    • It was during this time of war that there was a lot of deaths in the upper hierarchies of the villages. One by one, chiefs either died or were murdered by either the whites or natives that did not agree with a chief's politics with the whites. Be it the chief was friendly or hostile towards them. The lethality of the position took the shine off of it for any successor and the whites pretty much decided that they would only acknowledge the at one time only still living Chief of the village that would later become North Bend, as the only official chief. So while there were still chiefs of villages, the whites-only viewed the chief of the North Bend village as being the one with diplomatic power to make policy with them for the Coosan area.
  • 1856: Thanks in part to the white settlers of Mythic Wood, who protected the Native's right to live in their valley, the rest of the natives of the Coos Bay Coosans tribes were removed to the lower Umpqua River at Fort Umpqua. The Lower Coquilles were taken along with other defeated Southern Oregon Hostiles, to Siletz Agency on the newly created Coast Reservation.
    • In the horrible conditions at Fort Umpqua the natives faced near extinction as disease and starvation killed most of the population. It was difficult for the medicine men and women of the locals to combat the foreign diseases they never faced before. Luckily the Mythic Wood tribe was protected by loyal settlers and also the natural seclusion of the valley so they did not suffer the herding of natives that happened in the bay area. On top of all the natural and human benefits, there was one particular medicine woman, Samantha Stargazer, who was able to cure and protect the natives and settlers alike in the valley. She is a town legend and her birthday, March 13th is celebrated as a local holiday.
    • William Harris and fifteen volunteers from Coos Bay went down to Gold Beach to fight the hostiles there. When they returned home they forcibly "encouraged" the natives of the bay area to gather at a sandspit about a mile below what is now Empire. As the villages were emptied, the dugout houses were burned along with the baskets, canoes, and other property. Despite this, the local natives still were very friendly towards the whites.
    • While the natives were at the sandspit they were given names by the volunteers. Jackson, Dick, Matilda, Taylor, Bob, John, George, Annie, Charley, Stephen, Fannie, Pete, Joe, Sam, Lottie, Johnson, Jack, "Kiss-My-Arse" these among others were some names given and retained. The natives were very accepting of these names because in their naming tradition receiving nicknames was a part of their culture. It was very normal for a native to go through several names in their lifetime. Retaining only one sacred secret name from birth.
  • 1860: All the tribes but those still protected in Mythic Wood Valley were marched together to the same reservation, located at Yachats under the Alsea Agency.
  • 1870: The Dream Dance, a local manifestation of the messianic Ghost Dance movement, was introduced in the area.
  • 1875: Once more the government lessens reservation lands and closes down the Alsea reservation. Many, both Lower Umquas and Coosans subsequently join the Suislaws on Siuslaw River while others returned to their original homelands. It was in this year that the Rocklin Family of Mythic Wood was able to finalize and arrange for the northern portion of Mythic Wood be turned into the SOTA Reservation.
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